Getting Help for Drug Use

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Managing your drug use may be a big step. If you reduce your drug use you may still crave them for some time after. Try not to be too hard on yourself if you don’t reach your immediate goal. Having to try several times may be part of reducing your use and it is important you keep trying. It may be helpful to have someone you can talk to. This may be a friend, a family member or a counselor. Check out the Get Help section of the website for more information.

Managing your drug use may include speaking to a professional. It is a good idea to talk to a doctor or drug and alcohol counselor about the best way to manage your drug use as the reduction of some drugs may cause medical complications.

Some suggestions for helping to manage your drug use may include:

Make it difficult to access drugs. For example if you are trying to stop smoking, throw out all your smokes, lighters and ashtrays so they are not tempting you.

Have things you can do to distract yourself when you feel like taking the drug. Some ideas are hanging out with friends who are not taking the drug, going for a run or walk, listening to music.

If possible get support from your family and friends. They may be more supportive of you if they know that you are trying to reduce its use.

Talking to someone - talking to someone you trust may be helpful in reducing your drug intake. This person may be a friend, family member or youth worker.

Counseling - It may be helpful for you to talk to a counselor. A good counselor can help you to work out how best to manage your drug use. Counseling can either be done in a group or individually. Your local doctor, hospital, community health center or youth worker should also be able to help you find information about getting help.

For more information. For more information on drugs, their effects on the body, and stories about teens who turned their lives around, check out the National Institute of Drug Abuse website for teens. You can also check out the treatment facility locator, talk to someone about a Native specific treatment center, or call the SAMHSA sponsored 24 hour helpline at 1-800-662-4357.

Click here to learn about more ways to get help for drug use.

 

Acknowledgement: This fact sheet was originally developed by youth and staff at ReachOut.com, a website that helps teens get through tough times. 



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